Cosmetic Tooth Bonding

Bonding is a popular treatment option because it provides a successful attachment between the filling material and the tooth’s original enamel and dentin. It looks like the original tooth and functions like it as well.

Direct composite bonding is used to recreate a smile in an additive manner, where little or no tooth reduction is needed. Direct bonding, in the hands of a skilled operator, is less costly than porcelain veneers and crowns and can be long-lasting with proper maintenance.

Teeth are a perfect combination of both strength and resilience and this is created through the fusion of enamel and dentin.

Enamel is the outer shell of the tooth or the portion that is visible within the mouth. It is composed of densely packed calcium crystals which are very hard and resistant to wear. Enamel is composed of no living material and is effectively mimicked by dental porcelain.

Dentin is the inner core of the tooth and is much more porous. Constructed of collagen tubes with calcium crystals, dentin is living tissue and transmits nerve sensation. Composite resins have properties similar to dentin and are a combination of a plastic resin and silica filler. This combination of materials allows for excellent tooth color replication and reliable adhesion.

Tooth bonding is used in several different ways, but is probably most useful for repairing chipped teeth.Bonding materials (high-density, modern plastics called composite resin) and porcelain—are more natural in color and can be designed to perfectly match the surrounding teeth making it difficult to discern there ever was a broken tooth.

Transitional bonding is used for anything from a mock-up to a full-mouth rehabilitation. It’s called transitional because it allows the patient to transition into more permanent dentistry as he or she can afford, or as the treatment sequence demands, and it allows the dentist time to work out any bite-related and esthetic issues. Transitional bonding is an important tool in the skillset of an accomplished cosmetic dentist.

Tooth bonding  FAQ

For what conditions is dental bonding considered?

Dental bonding is an option that can be considered to:

  • Repair decayed teeth (composite resins are used to fill cavities)
  • Repair chipped or cracked teeth
  • Improve the appearance of discoloured teeth
  • Close spaces between teeth
  • Make teeth look longer
  • Change the shape of teeth
  • Use as a cosmetic alternative to amalgam fillings
  • Protect a portion of the tooth’s root that has been exposed when gums recede

What is the procedure for having a tooth bonded?

  • Preparation. Little advance preparation is needed for dental bonding.Anaesthesia is often not necessary unless the bonding is being used to fill a decayed tooth. Your dentist will use a shade guide to select a composite resin colour that will closely match the colour of your tooth.
  • The bonding process. Next, the surface of the tooth will be roughened and a conditioning liquid applied. These procedures help the bonding material adhere to the tooth. The tooth-coloured, putty-like resin is then applied, moulded, and smoothed to the desired shape. An ultraviolet light or laser is then used to harden the material. After the material is hardened, your dentist will further trim and shape it, and polish it to match the sheen of the rest of the tooth surface.
  • Time to completion. Dental bonding takes about 30 to 60 minutes per tooth to complete

What are the advantages and disadvantages of dental bonding?

  • Advantages: Dental bonding is among the easiest and least expensive of cosmetic dental procedures. Unlike veneers and crowns, which are customised tooth coverings that must be manufactured in a laboratory, bonding usually can be done in one clinic visit unless several teeth are involved. Another advantage, compared with veneers and crowns, is that the least amount of tooth enamel is removed. Also, unless dental bonding is being performed to fill a cavity, anaesthesia is usually not required.
  • Disadvantages: Although the material used in dental bonding is somewhat stain resistant, it does not resist stains as well as crowns. Another disadvantage is that the bonding materials do not last as long nor are as strong as other restorative procedures, such as crowns, veneers, or fillings. Additionally, bonding materials can chip and break off the tooth.

Because of some of the limitations of dental bonding, some dentists view it as best suited for small cosmetic changes, for temporary correction of cosmetic defects, and for correction of teeth in areas of very low bite pressure (for example, front teeth). Consult with your dentist about the best cosmetic approach for your particular problem.

For more information about Cosmetic Tooth Bonding, contact Dr. Rozenberg and the staff at Lana Rozenberg D.D.S. at (212) 265-7724 or click here to schedule a consultation online for our New York City Dental Office.

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